Learning Sciences of Change

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Posts Tagged ‘science

Mapping social responsibility in science

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The vast majority of scientists want their research to be of use to society. They just disagree on how much society should interfere with what it is they study, and how they carry out their research,” says Glerup, who is working on a PhD project on scientific sociology at the Copenhagen Business School. Her research has shown that there are two different ideologies when it comes to research and public utility in the scientific community:

  • An ideology of internal control – the researchers know how the world works, so they are in a good position to find out how it should be. Therefore, they are ideally placed to judge about the public utility of their research.
  • An ideology of external control – social actors, such as politicians and organisations, know what is best for society, and this makes them ideally placed to determine what research should be done and how.

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Written by learningchange

16/04/2014 at 13:33

Quelles Synergies Sciences-Société pour Demain?

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Parce qu’elles visent à placer la recherche au cœur des enjeux les plus contemporains, les Rencontres Université–Société sont articulées autour de quatre thèmes faisant écho à la demande sociale : 1) Bien-être, handicap et santé; 2) Développement et durabilité; 3)  Qualité de vie et travail; 4) Art, culture, société. Universitaires, acteurs socio-économiques et culturels, grands témoins et médias ont proposé une restitution des travaux réalisés dans le cadre des ateliers et ont engagé la discussion avec le public à travers 4 tables rondes et un débat final.

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Written by learningchange

14/04/2014 at 20:40

Posted in Science, Society

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Science et opinion : une relation au regard de l’histoire

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La science aurait-elle l’opinion qu’elle mérite ? Y aurait-il deux mondes, celui des experts et des savants, et celui du commun des mortels. L’histoire longue de la confrontation entre la science et le public est une leçon éclairante sur les sentiments ambivalents que ce monde scientifique produit. Perçue comme sérieuse, hermétique ou aventureuse, menaçante ou bien rassurante, la science reste souvent pour l’homme de la rue une tour d’ivoire toute puissante qui fait autorité. Elle est productrice de certitudes, mais dans le même temps, le scientifique apparaît comme un chercheur qui doute et dont l’esprit critique est une caractéristique. D’un côté le dogmatisme, de l’autre l’esprit critique ! Et l’opinion publique dans tout cela ? D’un côté, il y a ceux qui savent et peuvent émettre des vérités scientifiques, et de l’autre ceux qui ne savent pas et doivent croire sur parole, faire confiance. Mais la montée en puissance de la société civile, capable de s’opposer, ne remet-elle pas en question ce rapport entre “science et opinion” au regard de l’Histoire ? Avec Bernadette Bensaude Vincent, professeure d’histoire et philosophie des sciences à l’université Paris X.

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Written by learningchange

27/03/2014 at 13:31

Posted in Population, Science

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Einstein reads ‘The Common Language of Science’

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Here’s an extraordinary recording of Albert Einstein from the fall of 1941, reading a full-length essay in English. The essay is called “The Common Language of Science.” It was recorded in September of 1941 as a radio address to the British Association for the Advancement of Science. The recording was apparently made in America, as Einstein never returned to Europe after emigrating from Germany in 1933. Einstein begins by sketching a brief outline of the development of language, before exploring the connection between language and thinking. “Is there no thinking without the use of language,” asks Einstein, “namely in concepts and concept-combinations for which words need not necessarily come to mind? Has not every one of us struggled for words although the connection between ‘things’ was already clear?”

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Written by learningchange

14/03/2014 at 14:26

Posted in Einstein, Science

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Science and Islam – BBC Documentary

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Science and Islam is a three-part BBC documentary about the history of science in medieval Islamic civilization presented by Jim Al-Khalili. The series is accompanied by the book Science and Islam: A History written by Ehsan Masood.

Episodes:

Part 1: The Language of Science

Part 2: The Empire of Reason

Part 3: The Power of Doubt

Its legacy is tangible, with terms like algebra, algorithm and alkali all being Arabic in origin and at the very heart of modern science – there would be no modern mathematics or physics without algebra, no computers without algorithms and no chemistry without alkalis.

Video

Read also:  Science and Islam: A History

Islamic Science and the Making of the European Renaissance

Written by learningchange

15/10/2013 at 05:53

Posted in Islam, Science

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Scientists must spearhead ethical use of big data

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The recent revelation that the National Security Agency collects the personal data of United States citizens, allies and enemies alike has broken the traditional model governing the bond between science and society. Most breakthrough technologies have dual uses. Think of atomic energy and the nuclear bomb or genetic engineering and biological weapons.

Let’s face it: Powered by the right type of Big Data, data mining is a weapon. It can be just as harmful, with long-term toxicity, as an atomic bomb. It poisonstrust, straining everything from human relations to political alliances and free trade. And when it is a weapon, it should be treated like a weapon.

To repair the damage already done, we researchers, with a keen understanding of the promise and the limits of our trade, must work for a world that uses science in an ethical manner. We can look at the three pillars of nuclear nonproliferation as a model for going forward. We can achieve this only in alliance with the society at large, together amending universal human rights with the right to data ownership and the right of safe passage.  If we scientists stay silent, we all risk becoming digitally enslaved.

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Written by learningchange

11/10/2013 at 14:29

Posted in Ethics, Science, Scientists

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The Science of “Music and Emotions”

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In “The Science of Opera,” actor Stephen Fry and comedian Alan Davies convene a panel of researchers from University College London to discuss what happened physiologically when the pair were hooked up to various sensors as they attended Verdi’s Simon Boccanegra at the Royal Opera House. Like the pairing at my first opera, Fry is a knowledgeable lover of the art and Davies is almost an opera virgin. The gadgets attached to Fry and Davies measured their heart rates, breathing, sweat, and “various other emotional responses.” What do we learn from the experiment? For one thing, as neurobiologist Michael Trimble informs us, “music is different from all the other arts.” For example, ninety percent of people surveyed admit to being moved to tears by a piece of music. Only five to ten percent say the same about painting or sculpture. Fry and Davies’ autonomic nervous system responses confirm the power of music (and story) to move us beyond our conscious control and awareness.

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Written by learningchange

08/10/2013 at 09:29

Posted in Emotions, Music, Science

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Optimism is a sine qua non for scientists

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Before any appreciation of the ability of science to improve society or knowledge of the power of the scientific method, there is the undiluted thrill of trying to understand the world that surrounds us. As children we constantly ask “how” and “why”, and scientists are those individuals who never grow out of the habit. Also like children, scientists are sustained by the dogged hope that, eventually, those questions will be answered. Hope is built upon optimism, enthusiasm and perhaps a certain level of naivety. These are personality traits we seldom link to a successful career in science, yet I would argue that they play an important and, in some cases, a vital role in sustaining scientific enquiry.

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Written by learningchange

07/10/2013 at 07:23

Posted in Science, Scientists

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Albert Einstein on ‘The Common Language of Science’

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Here’s an extraordinary recording of Albert Einstein from the fall of 1941, reading a full-length essay in English: The essay is called “The Common Language of Science.” It was recorded in September of 1941 as a radio address to the British Association for the Advancement of Science. The recording was apparently made in America, as Einstein never returned to Europe after emigrating from Germany in 1933. Einstein begins by sketching a brief outline of the development of language, before exploring the connection between language and thinking. “Is there no thinking without the use of language,” asks Einstein, “namely in concepts and concept-combinations for which words need not necessarily come to mind? Has not every one of us struggled for words although the connection between ‘things’ was already clear?”

Read & Listen

Written by learningchange

22/03/2013 at 09:15

Posted in Einstein, Science

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Science as an open enterprise

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Open inquiry is at the heart of the scientific enterprise. Publication of scientific theories – and of the experimental and observational data on which they are based – permits others to identify errors, to support, reject or refine theories and to reuse data for further understanding and knowledge. Science’s powerful capacity for self-correction comes from this openness to scrutiny and challenge.

The changes that are needed go to the heart of the scientific enterprise and are much more than a requirement to publish or disclose more data. Realising the benefits of open data requires effective communication through a more intelligent openness: data must be accessible and readily located; they must be intelligible to those who wish to scrutinise them; data must be assessable so that judgments can be made about their reliability and the competence of those who created them; and they must be usable by others. For data to meet these requirements it must be supported by explanatory metadata (data about data). As a first step towards this intelligent openness, data that underpin a journal article should be made concurrently available in an accessible database. We are now on the brink of an achievable aim: for all science literature to be online, for all of the data to be online and for the two to be interoperable.

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Written by learningchange

23/10/2012 at 12:20