Why the brain is more reluctant to function as we age

New findings, led by neuroscientists at the University of Bristol and recently published in the journal Neurobiology of Aging, reveal a novel mechanism through which the brain may become more reluctant to function as we grow older.

It is not fully understood why the brain’s cognitive functions such as memory and speech decline as we age. Although work published this year suggests cognitive decline can be detectable before 50 years of age. The research, led by Professor Andy Randall and Dr Jon Brown from the University’s School of Physiology and Pharmacology, identified a novel cellular mechanism underpinning changes to the activity of neurons which may underlie cognitive decline during normal healthy aging.

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About Giorgio Bertini

Director at Learning Change Project - Research on society, culture, art, neuroscience, cognition, critical thinking, intelligence, creativity, autopoiesis, self-organization, rhizomes, complexity, systems, networks, leadership, sustainability, thinkers, futures ++
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