Head Impacts Lead to Brain Changes in High School Football Players

After just one season of playing football, neuroimaging technology reveals changes in gray and white matter correlated with exposure to head trauma in high school students, new study reports. Brain imaging exams performed on high school football players after just one season revealed changes in both the gray and white matter that correlated with exposure to head impacts, according to a new study that will be presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). “It’s important to understand the potential changes occurring in the brain related to youth contact sports,” said Elizabeth Moody Davenport, Ph.D., a postdoctoral researcher at UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, Texas, who led this analysis. “We know that some professional football players suffer from a serious condition called chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE. We are attempting to find out when and how that process starts so that we can keep sports a healthy activity for millions of children and adolescents.”

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About Giorgio Bertini

Director at Learning Change Project - Research on society, culture, art, neuroscience, cognition, critical thinking, intelligence, creativity, autopoiesis, self-organization, rhizomes, complexity, systems, networks, leadership, sustainability, thinkers, futures ++
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