Bilingualism Could Offset Brain Changes in Alzheimer’s

A new study reports bilingual people have an advantage when it comes to brain plasticity. Researchers report being multilingual could help stave off cognitive decline associated with dementia.

After more than a decade of research, this much we know: it’s good for your brain to know another language. A new Concordia study goes further, however, focusing specifically on the effects of knowing a second language for patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI; a risk state for AD). “Most of the previous research on brain structure was conducted with healthy younger or older adults,” says Natalie Phillips, a professor in the Department of Psychology.

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About Giorgio Bertini

Research Professor. Founder Director at Learning Change Project - Research on society, culture, art, neuroscience, cognition, critical thinking, intelligence, creativity, autopoiesis, self-organization, rhizomes, complexity, systems, networks, leadership, sustainability, thinkers, futures ++
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