Untreated Sleep Apnea in Children Can Harm Brain Cells Tied to Cognition and Mood

Study reports reduced gray matter in areas of the brain associated with mood and cognition in children with obstructive sleep apnea. MRI scans link chronically disrupted sleep to widespread brain cell damage.

A study comparing children between 7 and 11 years of age who have moderate or severe obstructive sleep apnea to children the same age who slept normally, found significant reductions of gray matter – brain cells involved in movement, memory, emotions, speech, perception, decision making and self-control – in several regions of the brains of children with sleep apnea.

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About Giorgio Bertini

Research Professor. Founder Director at Learning Change Project - Research on society, culture, art, neuroscience, cognition, critical thinking, intelligence, creativity, autopoiesis, self-organization, rhizomes, complexity, systems, networks, leadership, sustainability, thinkers, futures ++
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