How Neurons Form Long-Term Memories

Mouse study reveals how neurons reorganize following experiencing novel stimuli. The study reports a possible mechanism for memory consolidation and recall, shedding new light on the biological underpinnings for long-term memory.

On a late summer day in 1953, a young man who would soon be known as patient H.M. underwent experimental surgery. In an attempt to treat his debilitating seizures, a surgeon removed portions of his brain, including part of a structure called the hippocampus. The seizures stopped.

Unfortunately, for patient H.M., so too did time. When he woke up after surgery, he could no longer form new long-term memories, despite retaining normal cognitive abilities, language and short-term working memory. Patient H.M.’s condition ultimately revealed that the brain’s ability to create long-term memories is a distinct process that depends on the hippocampus.

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About Giorgio Bertini

Research Professor. Founder Director at Learning Change Project - Research on society, culture, art, neuroscience, cognition, critical thinking, intelligence, creativity, autopoiesis, self-organization, rhizomes, complexity, systems, networks, leadership, sustainability, thinkers, futures ++
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