Blood Test for Alzheimer’s Disease Predicts Future Cognitive Decline in Healthy People

Higher baseline levels of N-terminal fragment of tau in the blood of healthy subjects was associated with an increased risk of developing cognitive deficits and Alzheimer’s disease later in life.

Today, a clinician can order a blood test to check a patient’s cholesterol or hemoglobin A1c levels — biomarkers that help predict an individual’s risk of cardiovascular disease or diabetes, respectively. But despite decades of advances in the understanding of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), a blood test for predicting its risk remains elusive. Imaging scans of the brain and lumbar punctures that collect cerebrospinal fluid can offer diagnoses, but such tests are expensive and cumbersome for patients.

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Research paper

About Giorgio Bertini

Research Professor. Founder Director at Learning Change Project - Research on society, culture, art, neuroscience, cognition, critical thinking, intelligence, creativity, autopoiesis, self-organization, rhizomes, complexity, systems, networks, leadership, sustainability, thinkers, futures ++
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