Learning Sciences of Change

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Archive for the ‘Affective’ Category

We Feel, Therefore We Learn: The Relevance of Affective and Social Neuroscience to Education

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Recent advances in neuroscience are highlighting connections between emotion, social functioning, and decision making that have the potential to revolutionize our understanding of the role of affect in education. In particular, the neurobiological evidence suggests that the aspects of cognition that we recruit most  heavily in schools, namely learning, attention, memory, decision making, and social functioning, are both profoundly affected by and subsumed within the processes of emotion; we call these aspects emotional thought.  Moreover, the evidence from brain-damaged patients suggests the hypothesis that emotion-related processes are required for skills and knowledge to be transferred from the structured school environment to real-world decision making because they provide an emotional rudder  to guide judgment and action. Taken together, the evidence we present sketches an account of the neurobiological underpinnings of morality, creativity, and culture, all topics of critical importance to education. Our hope is that a better understanding of the neurobiological relationships between these constructs will provide a new basis for innovation in the design of learning environments.

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Read also: What is Wisdom and how is it Learned?

The Heart-Brain Connection: The Neuroscience of Social, Emotional, and Academic Learning

Written by learningchange

04/11/2013 at 12:30

Affective profiles: happiness, depression, life satisfaction, and happiness-increasing strategies

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The affective profiles model categorizes individuals as self-fulfilling (high positive affect, low negative affect), high affective (high positive affect, high negative affect), low affective (low positive affect, low negative affect), and self-destructive (low positive affect, high negative affect). The model has been used extensively among Swedes to discern differences between profiles regarding happiness, depression, and also life satisfaction. The aim of the present study was to investigate such differences in a sample of residents of the USA. The study also investigated differences between profiles with regard to happiness-increasing strategies.

The results showed that, compared to the other profiles, self-fulfilling individuals were less depressed, happier, and more satisfied with their lives. Nevertheless, self-destructive individuals were more depressed, unhappier, and less satisfied than all other profiles. The self-fulfilling individuals tended to use strategies related to agentic (e.g., instrumental goal-pursuit), communal (e.g., social affiliation), and spiritual (e.g., religion) values when pursuing happiness.

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Written by learningchange

02/10/2013 at 10:17

Posted in Affective

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The Risk of Aging Fathers

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While women have long been told that fertility drops off as they age, men may have a biological clock as well. The offspring of older male mice have several copy number mutations in gene regions associated with developmental disorders, according to a new study publishing today (August 30) in Translational Psychiatry. The findings could explain why the children of older men have higher rates of schizophrenia and autism than those with younger fathers.

Written by learningchange

21/09/2011 at 11:52

Posted in Affective, Emotional, Father

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